"Philosophy of Freedom" by Rudolph Steiner

 

...if the soul has not at some time found itself faced in utmost seriousness by the problem of free will or necessity it will not have reached its full stature.

Steiner, Rudolf (2014-04-14). Philosophy of Freedom (Kindle Locations 300-301).  . Kindle Edition.

  photo by d. Barnard

 

photo by d. Barnard

Man ultimately has his fate in his own hands, though the path to this condition of freedom is a long and a hard one, in the course of which he must develop merciless knowledge of himself and selfless understanding of others. 

Steiner, Rudolf (2014-04-14). Philosophy of Freedom (Kindle Locations 102-105).  . Kindle Edition. 

An attempt is made to prove that there is a view of the nature of man's being which can support the rest of knowledge; and further, that this view completely justifies the idea of free will, provided only that we have first discovered that region of the soul in which free will can unfold itself.

Steiner, Rudolf (2014-04-14). Philosophy of Freedom (Kindle Locations 302-304).  . Kindle Edition. 

Again, we do not want any knowledge of the kind that has become frozen once and for all into rigid academic rules, preserved in encyclopedias valid for all time. Each of us claims the right to start from the facts that lie nearest to hand, from his own immediate experiences, and thence to ascend to a knowledge of the whole universe. We strive after certainty in knowledge, but each in his own way.

Steiner, Rudolf (2014-04-14). Philosophy of Freedom (Kindle Locations 353-356).  . Kindle Edition. 

...and a nice, succinct summary of the goal of Waldorf education:

Even with the immature human being, the child, we do not nowadays cram knowledge into it, but we try to develop its capacities so that it will no longer need to be compelled to understand, but will want to understand.

Steiner, Rudolf (2014-04-14). Philosophy of Freedom (Kindle Locations 359-360).  . Kindle Edition.